Hrothgar Becomes King of the Danes

<p><p>After Hrothgar became king <br>
he won many battles:<br>
his friends and family<br>
willingly obeyed him;<br>
his childhood friends<br>
became famous soldiers.<br>
<br>
So Hrothgar decided <br>
he would build a mead-hall,<br>
the greatest the world had <br>
ever seen, or even imagined.<br>
There he would share out<br>
to young and old alike<br>
all that God gave him<br>
(except for public lands and men’s lives).<br>
<br>
I have heard that orders <br>
went out far and wide;<br>
tribes throughout the world<br>
set to work on that building.<br>
And it was built, the world’s <br>
greatest mead-hall. <br>
And that great man<br>
called the building <br>
“Herot,” the hart.<br>
<br>
After it was built,<br>
Hrothgar did what he said <br>
he would: handed out gold <br>
and treasure at huge feasts. <br>
That hall was high-towered,<br>
tall and wide-gabled<br>
(though destruction awaited,<br>
fire and swords of family trouble;<br>
and outside in the night waited <br>
a tortured spirit of hell).<br>
<br>
The words of the poet,<br>
the sounds of the harp,<br>
the joy of people echoed.<br>
The poet told how the world <br>
came to be, how God made the earth<br>
and the water surrounding,<br>
how He set the sun and the moon<br>
as lights for people<br>
and adorned the earth<br>
with limbs and leaves for everyone.<br>
Hrothgar’s people lived in joy, <br>
happy until that wanderer of the wasteland,<br>
Grendel the demon, possessor of the moors,<br>
began his crimes.<br>
<br>
He was of a race of monsters<br>
exiled from mankind by God–<br>
He was of the race of Cain, <br>
that man punished for <br>
murdering his brother.<br>
From that family comes<br>
all evil beings–<br>
monsters, elves, zombies.<br>
Also the giants who <br>
fought with God and got <br>
repaid with the flood<br>
<br>